The worst financial reporting of all time, courtesy CTV Calgary local news

Take a look at this. It’s hilariously stupid. It will only take a minute of your time (seriously, the video is that short).

 

 

So apparently the US dollar is a paper currency that is good because it is backed by the Federal Reserve. And the Federal Reserve backs the US dollar with… paper currency. I guess. I cannot follow the tortured logic here. I am embarrassed on this reporter’s behalf. The whole point of fiat currency is that it isn’t backed by anything and that you can just print it if you want!

Gold not being “backed” by anything is meaningless — after all, paper currencies used to be backed by gold!

When Greenspan says something like, “World currencies are down,” he is saying they are down against something. That something is gold.

Oh hell I don’t even need to criticize this further. It’s just so unbelievably dumb. It makes me laugh. It makes me cry. I think they snatched the reporter from a hair commercial or something, because she demonstrably knows nothing about money.

When you are watching gold prices, remember this chart.

A little while back Casey Research provided this chart:

Why do you care?

Maybe you don’t, because you don’t own gold and you think it’s a barbarous relic like that Roubini, so you would never want to buy it.

But if you aren’t like Roubini (and most other people), you should care.

Basically, this chart shows that during the last two years of gold fever in the 70s, there were seven corrections that averaged 10%. You have to remember that at this time, gold interest was really intense. At present, gold interest is still very low.

The important point is that although we are in a significant bull market for gold, volatility is not abnormal. I wouldn’t necessarily be alarmed if gold fell 15-20% — in fact, such a situation would present a great buying opportunity.

This doesn’t mean you should sit and wait for such a correction — it might not happen to that extent. The biggest correction we’ve seen in 2011 was 6.2% in January. Instead, the main point of this chart is that while we are in troubling economic times, there will be moments where weaker players are nervous and eager to sell their gold. Just don’t sell yours.

Gold and silver versus paper promises.

Head on over to this site and take a look at the tables presented. The data speaks for itself.

What will happen to commodities in 2011?

First, consider the following:

Commodities are up across the board, in some cases quite dramatically. This boom is international — manufacturers are bidding up prices and there are strains on available supplies.

Yet consumer prices are not rising significantly. Canada currently has a higher official inflation rate than the US, but not much more. Commodity prices have been bid up in anticipation of rising consumer demand, a prediction which is not panning out.

Remember the insight of Austrian economics — consumers set final prices, not producers. Consumer spending is weak. Unemployment remains high. Without a surge in consumer spending, these prices are unsustainable. If there is a recession in Asia, and I think there will be (probably next year), then these prices are likely to tank.

Western banks are stockpiling excess reserves. If this money does not get lent out, unemployment will remain high and consumer spending will continue to suffer. There are no signs that bankers will suddenly become optimistic. China is slowing down. Same with South Korea and Japan.

What about gold? Gold follows a different set of rules. Central banks buy and sell gold. It is a hedge against the currency crises and mass inflation, rather than recession, where currency appreciates. China is encouraging its citizens to buy gold. When Austrian business cycle theory bites back at China’s bubble, there may be less drive to build shopping malls where no one buys or sells anything, but people will still yearn to preserve their savings with the precious metal as their government devalues money like its going out of style.

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