Canadian Healthcare: As Little Care As Possible

Few people realize what is implied with public healthcare. Government services are funded through taxation. They receive money irrespective of their service to the customer. This is why the public sector is so frequently characterized by incompetence, waste, carelessness, laziness, mistreatment, and delusion (“we serve the public good”).

Unlike a normal business, which is rewarded based on how much its output satisfies the consumer, the government services regard the consumer as a burden that consumes resources that it has already taken. Why should it be encouraged to provide good service? Hence, the tendency will always be for public services to maximize the cost, and minimize the actual service provided.

Some recent stories out of B.C. provide classic illustrations. Delta Hospital recently sent home a blind 90-year-old lady home by herself in the middle of the night with a bleeding arm and wrapped in a bed sheet.

In another case, a 76-year-old lady was at Mount St. Joseph for two weeks with pneumonia and anemia. She was sent home, when her condition was obviously still delicate. At home she kept drifting in and out of consciousness, so her son returned her to the hospital, where she collapsed on arrival.

After six hours, the hospital declared she should stay overnight. The son went home to gather some things for his mother. When he returned less than three hours later, he was informed his mother had been sent home.

2012 hospital discharge complaint

Seniors are treated especially poorly by public hospitals

She was sent home in a taxi, alone and afraid, with no ID, no money, no keys to her home, and hospital staff had dressed her in someone else’s clothes.

For government services, the consumer is a burden that needs to be sent home as soon as possible, with or without proper care having been administered. This is especially reprehensible in the healthcare system, where our seniors are systematically mistreated by contemptuous staff.

— Read more at CBC.ca —

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